Frequently Asked Questions

Thank you for visiting Wallenstein's technical support and product operation FAQ section. You will find many helpful tips on the operation of your Wallenstein equipment.

Questions

The MX25, MX50 and MX80 paddles are welded on and are not replaceable. The MX130 standard beater bar paddles are bolted on and are individually replaceable.

The optional top beater bar on the MX130 uses weld–on paddles that are not replaceable.

The optional end gate acts as a tailgate, preventing material from dropping out in unwanted areas, such as when transporting. It folds out of the way when not required.

On the MX50 and MX80, the end gate is operated manually. On the MX130, the end gate is operated hydraulically. The necessary hoses and fittings to connect to the tractor are included with the spreader.

The optional fines pan holds the material at the beaters until it is chopped fine enough to exit. It folds out of the way when not required.

On the MX25, MX50 and MX80, the fines pan is operated manually. On the MX130, the fines pan is operated hydraulically. The necessary hoses and fittings are included.

The drive system is a ratchet arrangement. The drive plate has ramped teeth formed into the face and is splined to the hub. The driven plate, or receiver, has square holes cut into the face to accept the driver teeth, and is keyed to the axle along with the apron drive sprocket. The two are held together by a spring.

Each wheel has its own ratchet. Pulling the spreader forward causes the teeth to engage the holes and drive the apron chain. If one wheel is turning faster than the other or turning backwards, such as in tight turns, the outside wheel will continue to drive the apron chain while the ramps on the inside wheel cause the drive to slip. When reversing, both ratchets will slip and prevent the apron chain from moving. Slipping ratchets will cause a clicking sound as the drive teeth slip in and out of the receiver.

In the MX25, MX50 and MX80, the apron speed adjustment is actually a ratchet mechanism, which changes the amount of apron chain travel between clicks. Longer apron chain travel, which is consider the Fast setting, increases the amount of manure fed to the beater bar, thus increasing the amount of manure spread per pass. Shorter apron travel, which is considered the Slow setting, reduces the amount of manure fed to the beater bar, and thus the amount of material spread per pass.

In the MX130, speed adjustment is accomplished with a 3-speed gearbox which changes the apron speed. The Fast setting increases the amount of manure fed to the beater bar, thus increasing the amount of manure spread per pass. The Slow setting reduces the amount of manure fed to the beater bar, and thus the amount of material spread per pass.

 

Only the MX130 and the MX130T feature the cleanout function. The apron chain is on high speed but the beater bar is off.

The listed capacity is heaped.

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